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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
with dividends in a zero interest rate environment. cheryl: forget bonds and other alternative investments, stocks really are the only option at this point? >> well, it's got to be a part of the portfolio. cheryl: a bigger piece? >> yeah, a bigger piece. have some cash with scares and shocks along the way. at some point, if the economy does continue to grow, people worry about when is the fed going to take the punch bowl away, and that worries people. you have a risk of something happening in europe, the middle east is a mess, and so there's a lot of reasons to have a little bit of cash, but if you have a return, an absolute return in the environment, large cap multinationals have to be a part of it. cheryl: thank you very much. good to see you. >> thank you. cheryl: well, the next fight between congress and president obama will be over two controversial cabinet selections coming down in an hour from now. rich edson joining me from inside the beltway with the latest on the two picks from the president. rich? >> well, cheryl, the headline here, according to white house officials, senator ch
don't agree with that, but that's what happened. the environment is different this time, and i'm actually pleased to tell you that the speaker of the assembly, john perez, and others have engaged in a bipartisan approach to fixing this and there's bipartisan support for pushing through a law that would fix the problem. and essentially, what it will do is this. instead of referring to rape by fraud, only if the perp is impersonating the spouse, it will be, if the perpetrator is impersonating an intimate partner, which more accurately flects common and modern-day relationships. >> so, wait, you said it died in the senate because it would have increased the budget. is that in part part of increasing the prison population? >> that's correct, exactly right. as you know, california recently underwent a shift in criminal justice policy, where we realigned state responsibilities for low-level offenders to the counties, because a three-judge court panel decided that we rightly had decided that we had an overcrowding problem in california state prisons, and we needed to relieve the popul
it is that they have no intention of doing, anyway. basically, we live in an environment where things are going to continue to change and businesses are going to feel money if they feel there's an end demand that justifies that. there's end demand in china, end demand globally and moderate end demand in the u.s. the reality is businesses have done relatively well for the last two or three years and will continue to. >> real quickly, herbalife later this week will be making a big presentation trying to defend itself from bill ackmann. your thoughts? >> look, i happen to feel that waging your short selling campaign on the air waves a way of dictating stock price, i am personally uncomfortable with. i think it's the wrong way to go about investing because it raises all these questions of are you making a legitimate analysis of the underlying business of the company or are you trying to shift the momentum in order to make money off the stock direction? >> you don't think that bill ackmann is going out, and then selling without us knowing? >> no, i don't believe that. i just don't think that's the
the crop insurance program. jenna: last question. we talk about the environment we talk about the fiscal environment, and that is very much reality for you as the secretary of agriculture. where do you see the opportunity to cut, when you look at your own budget in the fiscal environment in the year ahead where are you looking potentially for the savings of american people. >> we reduced our budget by 12 1/2%. our workforce is down by 6,000 folks. we're restructuring, closing offices and being more efficient but there is also the opportunity within the farm programs. that is one of the missed opportunities not getting the farm bill passed because there were reforms in what the senate passed and what the house ag committee passed would have provide somewhere between 23 and $34 billion worth of savings. hopefully we rest sure rec reforms as we continue the debate this year. jenna: nice to have you on the program. really appreciate your time today. >> thank you. jon: now this fox news alert. testimony just wrapped up in a colorado courtroom revealing some chilling new details about the movi
? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leaderships and international community. in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
in this environment. they were supposed to be gamestop's salvation, instead down more than 15%. can you believe that? that seems like maybe management is -- they're not ready for this. maybe they don't have as good of a handle on things as they think. plus the new video game consoles that bulls are excited about do get released, they might include technology that makes it so only the original user could play that game. that would be something, right? beyond the ailing used game business, gamestop plans to grow the digital business, selling games over the internet, dramatically over the next couple of years. but, i don't see how they compete against more established online players. fact is, gamestop has to compete with amazon on way too many fronts. they sell the same gaming hardware and software, does digital down loads too, letting you buy and download games online, amazon's on fire here and they do it really well. and amazon makes it easy to find and buy used video games by connecting you with vendors and individuals all over the world who want to sell. you don't want to be in competition with ama
use in the academic environment. as some of you know, three of our member publishers sued georgia state university because when georgia state moved its from printed course packs as materials for higher education courses to e-reserves, they made another change. they stopped paying a penny for anything put up on e-reserves no matter how, how long it was. and since 2006 not a penny has been paid. and because georgia state was, in the view of publishers, an outlier in that respect because we have understood and we think many people have understood that copyright is agnostic or same rules would apply whether we're talking print or digital, that's what led to this particular litigation. and i would say that there this -- we know there's all this vagueness and difficult any the deciding what is fair use. and you can run through four factors, but the bottom line, this is hard to figure out in many cases. but some cases are clearer than others. in the cases where large amounts of material are being used semester after semester after semester not paid for if any amount no matter how long th
we like wells fargo a lot. they get hurt in a low rate environment, they'll be helped a tremendous amount when short rates move up, and investors have not yet been willing to believe that the mortgage profits are sustainable. even though wells has got 30% market share of the mortgage market, which over time should be a positive. it's just they're not willing to give them full credit for it yet. >> moshe, thanks for your time. >> thanks very much. >> i did want to discuss some breaking news on morgan stanley. the company, a number of news outlets reporting job cuts coming there. we can confirm and clarify some of those reports. morgan stanley sources close to the company indicating they will cut about 6% of its overall institutional securities, and infrastructure staff. those cuts will total 1,600 jobs, half would be international, half will be domestic. again, 6% of securities and infrastructure. now, putting that in perspective, the company has 57,000 total employees. some have reported 6% overall, that is not correct. again, if you do the math, it would be 1,600 total. they've be
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
environment. they have the biggest brain to body weight ratio. these guys are no dummies. >> reporter: orcas are led by the females, who live up to 80 years. in this case, it's believed the grandmother found an opening and led them out. it will be up to her to keep them alive. navigating a patch work of ice for hundreds of miles in search of the open sea. neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle. >> hundreds of miles, but they can only travel one mile without -- and then they need a breath. so how does that work out? >> i'm no marine biologist, but the odds don't sound good they can survive, unless that ice melts more quickly than people are expecting right now. so you don't know how many of them there are or what other holes they can find or ice thin enough to pop through and get air. but the eyes of the world are watching that situation there. hopefully they're okay. but that plane flew over and no sign. so we'll keep you posted on that. >>> coming up, the high profile snub at the oscars. >>> but first, sizzling success for a cool industry, cashing in on a climate meltdown. you're watching "world
to come and learn and fire at east atrocious weapons, but do it in a safe, you know, environment, and the most important thing that would start a buy log between the gun owners and the first responders or the people that actually have been in combat, and the big thing about that, i think it will alleviate a big problem, which is the mistrust of these gun owners of law enforcement. so you put them together -- >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: they will see that the cops aren't nazis coming to get their guns but they will start a buy log -- >> stephanie: maybe they can have a dialogue about what it looks like to walk into a grade school and see what they have to see -- >> caller: exactly. that's what i mean. it's like you can go and -- i -- i don't hunt, but i like skeet shooting. i have been to, you know firing ranges. but if you put them together you lower the paranoia you lower the rhetoric. you lower the insane debate. >> stephanie: yeah that's what i don't get. right-wingers are all law and order until the police have a thought. >> but you are assuming ev
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
medicare. it's about the environment. you talked about going on vacation and coming back and hearing the same thing. we're talking about the same thing from '95 as we are today. we haven't really decided yet what type of country we want to be and how we want to spend the money in order to get there. we spend a great deal of money on education. we probably spend more money per student than any other industrialized nations. yet when you look at the collective global testing, we're somewhere in the middle of the pack. so the conversation we need to be having isn't just about how much money or how are we spending that money, and is this moving us towards the type of country we want to be? >> that's much too complicated. i'm just kidding. >> this is the point. this is the debate. there has to be a debate. we're going to debate how we spend our money. we're now talking about when we have the debates. we should be having it in the traditional manner in which the governments operate. if we don't, we're going to be dealing with these cliffs. >> that's right. we shouldn't wait until the last m
environment. there are still plenty of people who think the debt ceiling issues could be a debacle. february 15th, a little earlier than expected, a lot of people floating ideas that moody's might downgrade the u.s. debt sometime this quarter, if there's no grand bargain that ever appears, and that looks increasingly unlikely. i'm in the camp that the risk is to the down side on the stock market right now. earnings today, as you just mentioned here, look, the question has been whether or not putry was the trough in earnings that things would get better from here. it's going to be modest improvement. q4 isn't looking that great. we're only looking at roughly 3% improvement in earnings. that's not great. top line growth has been nonexistent throughout last year. q3 top line growth was zero. zero. we haven't seen that in a long time. you want to know how weird that is? the ten-year eenaverage is 7%. maybe it will be 3%. that's the hope. it's coming down as we're going in. so we may be at a trough in the third quarter, but the fourth quarter certainly isn't going to be gangbusters right now here
something like libya, chaos, bad acting, all things of -- all kinds of things can happen in that environment. host: early in this conflict, you and others wrote about the family dynamics in the the assad family. his mother is still alive, and by many accounts, calling the shots behind the scenes. can you elaborate? guest: i have not heard that. it is a family affair. his father ruled syria for many years pdt killed 30,000 syrians in putting in -- for many years. he killed 30,000 syrians. the security forces have held tight around him. his mother calling the shots -- i'm not aware of that. host: one of our viewers saying i would prefer the position of switzerland. no one seems interested in blowing up their cities. a position that continues to percolate -- a position that continues to percolate in this country. est: people who read -- our leaders read it such. they go into a full retrenchment, retreat view. world is a very chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a
are bio degradable. that's good for the environment. >> how do you know so much about i crapped my pants. >> i'm wearing them and i just did. >> just say oops i crapped my pants. [ laughter ] [ applause ] >> like i wasn't already freaked out about the nora virus, that makes you spew out both ends. >> stephanie: didn't [ inaudible ] poop on a plane -- no he peed. something he was drunk and he peed in an aisle. >> french people are always drunk. sorry. >> stephanie: now the "stephanie miller show" wishes to apologize to pot heads, people who poop their pants and the french. thanks a lot. the entire hour -- >> what is my last name? it's french. >> lavoie. gym, you can settle down, paul krugman is not going to be secretary of the treasury. >> dammit. >> stephanie: all rights were circulating, and he said while he is flattered to be considered, the obama administration would result in [ inaudible ] he say oh and there's not a chance i would be confirmed. >> well, there's that. >> stephanie: can you imagine. right-wing heads just exploding. [ explosion ] >> yeah. >> stephani
for gun shows and that's about all you are going to get from, you know, in the current environment with the republican congress. >> stephanie: i have said that but i think we should do whatever we can. >> caller: but at the same time you talk about high-cap ban, and assault weapon ban, and what you guys may not understand is like in california there is the highest capacity you can have is ten. well, you can buy a legally what they call a 10-30 magazine, so it's limited to 10 rounds and you can just alter it and make at it 30-round. and atf has about ten features they list that define an assault weapon, and if you have three or four of those features it is an assault weapon by definition. >> stephanie: which shooter was it -- it's hard to keep track anymore. but he had 6,000 rounds bill. >> caller: right. >> stephanie: i mean what -- i'm just saying -- what is wrong with this picture? we're having -- >> caller: well -- >> stephanie: -- military type slaughters in our schools and movie theaters. >> caller: stephanie you buy boxes of wine. do you need that -- >> st
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)